Numeracy Passports - Stage 4

To be successful, they need to know these without materials or prompts and respond correctly in three seconds:

Identifies all the numbers from 0-100
Can your child read aloud all the numbers to 100?
If you write any number from 0 to 100 can they say it correctly?
Identifies symbols for halves, quarters, thirds and fifths
Can your child read ½ as “one half” (do not let them call it “one over two” or “one out of two”)
Can your child read ¼ as “one quarter” (try to encourage one quarter not one fourth although both are correct. Make sure they do not say “one over four” or “one out of four”)
Can your child identify 1/3 and 1/5 and read them as “one third” and “one fifth” respectively?
Says forward and backward numbers from 0-100
Can your child count forwards to 100 from any starting point between 0 and 99?
Can your child count backwards to zero from any number below 100?
Says the number before & after 0-100
If you were to mention any number between 0 and 100, could your child tell you the number just before it and the number just after it? For example if I say “29”, your child should say “28 and 30”.
Skip counts from 0-100 in 2s, 5s, and 10s
Can your child skip count in 2s to 100 – e.g. two, four, six, eight … ninety six, ninety eight, one hundred.
Can your child count in fives? E.g. five, ten, fifteen, twenty, twenty five … ninety, ninety five, one hundred.
Can your child count in tens? E.g. ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety, one hundred.
Orders numbers in the range of 0-100
Can your child order cards with the numbers 0-100 correctly?
If you were to mention a few numbers between 0 and 100, could they tell you which is biggest? Smallest?
Knows groupings with 10
Does your child know all the ‘teens’ and what they stand for? E.g. 10 and 1 means 11, 10 and 2 means 12, 15 means 10 and 5, 18 means 10 and 8, 17 means 10 and 7, 16 is made up of one ten and 6 ones, 13 is made up of one 10 and 3 ones etc. It is important they understand all these variations for each number.
Knows groupings within 20
Does your child know all the groupings of ‘teen’ numbers to 20? E.g. 14 + 6, 15 + 5, 18 + 2, 11 + 9
Knows the number of tens in decades
Does your child know how many tens there are in any number ending in ‘0’? For example in 20 there are 2 tens, in 40 there are 4 tens, in 70 there are 7 tens.
Instantly recalls add and sub facts to 10
Can your child instantly recall (three seconds of less) all of the facts that equal 10 and the subtraction facts that start with 10? E.g. 2 + 8, 10 – 5, 7 + 3, 10 – 4, 3 + 7, 1 + 9, 10 – 6 etc.
Instantly recalls doubles to 20 and corresponding halves
Does your child instantly know the double facts to 20? E.g. 8 + 8, 3 + 3, 9 + 9, 5 + 5, 7 + 7 etc
Can your child tell you in three seconds what half of 16 is? Half of 12? Half of 8? Half of 14?
Instantly recalls “ten and …” facts
Does your child instantly tell you the answer to 10 + 3, 10 + 8, 10 + 4, 6 + 10, 7 + 10 etc
Recalls multiples of 10 that add to 100
Can your child tell you what you need to add to 40 to equal 100? What goes with 70? Do 40 + 50 equal 100? 80 and what make 100? Try and ask these questions in all these different forms.
Can use equations to show the result of mental calculations
If you give your child a problem to solve in their head, can they write the equation on paper to show how they solved it? Remember they will probably write it in a straight line, try not to show them the equations where one number is on top of the other like we learnt at school. We are looking for solutions like this: “If I had 40 apples and I gave 20 away how many would you have left?” written as 40 – 20 = 20 not as an algorithm (Vertically)